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DIY Hive construction and plans and tools. How to count up to 9 the easy way.

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Old 30th November 2013, 10:21 AM   #11
MuswellMetro
 
 
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The Dutch simplex boxes are the same volume and use the same size frame as the British standard Nationals (long lug frams we call them rather than long ears, Brtish Slang for Ears is lug hole) However whereas the British Nationals and Rose boxes are bottom bee space, the Dutch Simplex boxes are top Bee Space

As the Rose system does not use a Queen Excluder, I doubt it would matter the height of each individual box or it volume as the queen occupies were she wishes in the stack of boxes , the advantage of the Rose is the stanardisation of frame size through the hive stack and boxes of managable weight when full of Honey (15-18kg)

The OSB Rose, Simplex and National are all 46cm square external if you go simplex chose either a brood or honey super and standardise on that throughtout the hive stack and run it with max number of frames per box, A hive of 6 x rose oSB would have almost the same internal volume as a hive of 5x Simplex/National Brood boxes or 8 x Honey supers if you take into account the unusalable between box bee space, to get it more exact as the rose can take 12 frames due to 12mm sides you could run at 33mm Hoffman spacing rather than 35mm for shaving 2mm off the hoffman frames but is that worth it as you can use dummy boards?

some of the beekeepers on here and American beekepers use one size boxes , normally brood boxes , it just the weight that is the problem when full of honey

WE found we could not extract rose frames (190mm) in a 9 frame radial extractor and had to purchase tangential screens for the extractor, they take Brood frames ,Rose and Commercial
meant to say "very similar" rather than "same"

also added simplex when not wanted, sorry!!!
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Old 3rd December 2013, 10:20 AM   #12
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if langstroths are readily avaiable I suggest that you search for the Farrar method and uses langstroth mediums, or even looks for those beekeeping videos from the Germans that cover what they call rotational beekeeping





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Old 3rd December 2013, 11:15 AM   #13
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If Langstroths are readily avaiable I suggest that you search for the Farrar method and uses Langstroth mediums, or even looks for those beekeeping videos from the Germans that cover what they call rotational beekeeping...
As far as I can tell, the only thing that the Farrar method, the Rose method and the Celler method (the "German rotational method") have in common, is the fact that they use one size box.

The main idea of the Celler method is to renew comb annually. If you don't want to watch the videos and you're happy with Google Translate, you can read up on the Cellar method here and here. It results in somewhat less honey but much stronger hives.

The main idea of the Farrar method and the Rose method is to increase the brood body as much as possible before the main honey gathering season starts. The Farrar method does it by using two queens in one hive. The Rose method does it by continually expanding the size of the brood nest, using one queen. The Farrar method involves a bit of rotation as well, if I understand correctly. The Rose method has no rotation involved (except at year-end).

I think the essence of the Rose method is described in the PDF slide show that explains the Rose method, and you can use any size frame and box.

Last edited by ugcheleuce; 3rd December 2013 at 11:23 AM.
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Old 3rd December 2013, 01:48 PM   #14
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Would like to see her work my bees dressed like that.
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Old 4th December 2013, 09:44 AM   #15
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Would like to see her work my bees dressed like that.
Not all the time, but for most of this season, that is how we worked on the bees... and it is nice to be able to when the weather is really hot.
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Old 4th December 2013, 10:20 AM   #16
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I have been contacted by a dutch member who wants to make himself a Rose hive.

Are there any plans available for the Rose hive ?
The easiest answer for him is probably to buy the book (The Rose Hive Method) and see how Tim reduced the normal National box using timber and plywood. (As for me - I wouldn't use plywood.)

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Old 4th December 2013, 05:04 PM   #17
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Not all the time, but for most of this season, that is how we worked on the bees... and it is nice to be able to when the weather is really hot.
A little over dressed for the high pressure in July, t shirt, shorts and sandals was the order of the day once the sun got up.
Lets hope we get a string of good summers now, I think we're due some and these things are usually cyclical with a bunch of seasons following a loose pattern.
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Old 9th December 2013, 12:22 AM   #18
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