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Old 16th September 2013, 11:23 AM   #1
Rob55
 
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Default When do wax moth become a problem?

When do wax moth generally become a problem? I have had a couple of drawn empty supers lying in my garage for a few weeks and I know we have a lot of moths outside at the moment so just a little concerned in case any eggs have been laid in my frames.
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Old 16th September 2013, 11:30 AM   #2
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Hi Rob55,
Lots of wax moth around this year. Saw one stroll into one of my strong hives in the middle of the afternoon. I would freeze the frames before stacking with roof on and wrapped in thick plastic bag/s!
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Old 16th September 2013, 11:37 AM   #3
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Are undrawn frames with foundation a problem or is it more likely to be drawn frames to watch out for?
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Old 16th September 2013, 11:38 AM   #4
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with Beeno.
They make a terrible mess.
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Old 16th September 2013, 11:51 AM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rob55 View Post
Are undrawn frames with foundation a problem or is it more likely to be drawn frames to watch out for?
Foundation is less likely to be attacked, but may 'dry out' in storage. Wrapping may help, but it can be 'freshened up' with a gentle waft of a hairdryer before use.

Its the old cocoon silk (protein source for the moth larvae) in used brood frames that is the real magnet...
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Old 16th September 2013, 11:52 AM   #6
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They are attracted to drawn frames, I think.I've had a box of foundation out all season ready for an AS that wasn't needed and it's still OK.
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Old 16th September 2013, 12:09 PM   #7
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Not with beano!

Supers, particularly wet ones with no brooded cells are far safer than brooded frames.

No need for a roof if they are in your garage, just need to be waxmoth-free and stacked with, say, a fine mesh below and a crownboard above, or similar. They benefit by being held tightly together to avoid any small gaps where moth may otherwise gain entry. Seal any imperfections.

Waxmoth damage to foundation is possible but unlikely. There should not be undrawn foundation in frames, shirley? It will only dry out and warp. Undrawn foundation is always best stored in the original packaging and preferably sealed. It is usually warm brood comb that is most at risk, more so if stored close together as they are in a hive or closer if plastic spacers are removed.

Best thing to do is inspect them for damage now. Waxmoth can be a nuisance all year round if it not a cold winter.

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Old 16th September 2013, 02:10 PM   #8
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Not with Oliver,
Our apiary lost a whole stack of supers stored in insulated but unheated shed to wax moth last winter - of the same opinion as you I guess. Oh, and frames treated with Certan or whatever it is called!
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Old 16th September 2013, 02:25 PM   #9
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Some like to freeze the extracted frames and store wet.. ready for next season.

Whilst frames are in the deepfreeze... blowtorch the super boxes to fry and wax moth eggs etc.

Grandad used to stack the wet frames in supers above an empty brood box that had either a sulphur candle lit or a strong chip shop pickling vinegar acid stuff ( ethanoic acid?... is that glacial acetic acid)) and put a roof on with newspaper under it

Remember it used to stink out the garage!
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Old 16th September 2013, 02:31 PM   #10
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I've stacked my supers (quite a few) in a shed with old QE's below and crownboards on top and never had a problem with wax month in them.

Brood chambers are a different story! It's worth an occaisional visual inspection if like me you don't have access to a deep freezer atm.

I have lost a few brood frames in the past, luckily the older manky ones that should have been melted down anyway!
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