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Old 12th July 2013, 01:02 PM   #1
Norton Caff
 
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Default Bee sting remedy - hot water

Having read the recent thread regarding bee stings I thought I would offer the following observation. Sorry it's so long!

I take anti-histamine pills before approaching a hive as I react to stings with swelling and severe itching a few hours after the incident. This lasts 6 days or so. I am not sure whether these pills have any effect as they don't on my hayfever.
My solution to my intense itching is not cold and ice packs. At night I used to lie in bed scratching away unable to sleep with an icepack tied to the sting site but now I use hot water. After being stung on the hand a while ago I was having a shower and found that the hot water, although initially seemed far hotter than it was (the water didn't feel too hot on my other hand), it reduced the itch and the swelling. That night I had a good night's sleep and needed no coolpack.
So now when I get stung I put the offended (!) area of my body in hot water, as hot as a normal part of the body can take so nothing too hot. I keep topping up the heat until the itch subsides. The effects last several hours, unlike the cortisone cream and useless antihistamine creams I have tried. The swelling is reduced too. I thought I wouldn't want to try this on my face but I did use a hot flannel on my eyelid when I was stung last week, keeping the flannel hot by dunking it back in hot water. This did work to a certain extent as the itch was much reduced but to be honest tolerating that heat in the eye area was difficult and gave me a headache. But for any other part of my body I will be continuing with this method as it works for me.
I thought I'd mention all this because it could help someone and personally I think the cold treatment, in comparison, seems to either have no effect or makes things worse.
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Old 12th July 2013, 04:36 PM   #2
sipa
 
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thanks, I'll try that next time
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Old 12th July 2013, 04:57 PM   #3
beezers
 
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Carry a flask of hot water,tea-bag & mug with you. Drink tea, save the tea-bag to use on sting.
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Old 14th July 2013, 10:00 PM   #4
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Could the heat be denaturing the enzymes in the sting? possibly try heat for an hour or so after the sting and then cool to reduce the swelling?
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Old 14th July 2013, 10:04 PM   #5
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Found the use of an Aspivenin really helps. Not noticeable after a couple of days. Obviously it will depend on the person and severity of sting.
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Old 14th July 2013, 10:08 PM   #6
Roola
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Norton Caff View Post
Having read the recent thread regarding bee stings I thought I would offer the following observation. Sorry it's so long!

I take anti-histamine pills before approaching a hive as I react to stings with swelling and severe itching a few hours after the incident. This lasts 6 days or so. I am not sure whether these pills have any effect as they don't on my hayfever.
My solution to my intense itching is not cold and ice packs. At night I used to lie in bed scratching away unable to sleep with an icepack tied to the sting site but now I use hot water. After being stung on the hand a while ago I was having a shower and found that the hot water, although initially seemed far hotter than it was (the water didn't feel too hot on my other hand), it reduced the itch and the swelling. That night I had a good night's sleep and needed no coolpack.
So now when I get stung I put the offended (!) area of my body in hot water, as hot as a normal part of the body can take so nothing too hot. I keep topping up the heat until the itch subsides. The effects last several hours, unlike the cortisone cream and useless antihistamine creams I have tried. The swelling is reduced too. I thought I wouldn't want to try this on my face but I did use a hot flannel on my eyelid when I was stung last week, keeping the flannel hot by dunking it back in hot water. This did work to a certain extent as the itch was much reduced but to be honest tolerating that heat in the eye area was difficult and gave me a headache. But for any other part of my body I will be continuing with this method as it works for me.
I thought I'd mention all this because it could help someone and personally I think the cold treatment, in comparison, seems to either have no effect or makes things worse.

Do you do this straight after or in the days after... I had my 4 th sting of the season today and hoping each sting will reduce in reaction but mine seem to only hurt for 10 mins, no itch for hours after, it's not normally until the next day that arms or legs swell like Popeye and the itching becomes horrid! Maybe I'll try the hot water!! I also take antihistamines prof and after if I'm stung but they seem to do bugger all.
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Old 14th July 2013, 10:14 PM   #7
BDCS
 
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Antihistamines just make me sleep
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Old 14th July 2013, 11:15 PM   #8
beeno
 
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Hi Norton Caff,
Worth a go. Thanks for posting.
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Old 15th July 2013, 11:47 AM   #9
Ziggymole
 
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I think the effect of putting a hot compress on an area is that it opens up the blood vessels, whereas putting a cold compress on closes them up.

If that is the case then perhaps heat helps the body remove and treat the area with whatever our immune systems have to help. Perhaps cold stops that happening quite so effectively.

It will be very interesting if one of the medically qualified beeks gives a response to this.

Ziggy
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Old 15th July 2013, 10:25 PM   #10
Karol
 
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There's a product on the market called Biteaway that works on the principle that applied heat denatures venom. I was asked to critically review the evidence base for it and I have to say that I could not find any real scientific evidence that it works but then I couldn't find any evidence to say it didn't either. Might be worth a punt as it's a very portable pen type device.

Regards,

Karol
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