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Old 13th February 2013, 11:29 PM   #1
BeeJoyful
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Default Inspecting double brood

Taken from this thread http://www.beekeepingforum.co.uk/showthread.php?t=22281. I didn't want to stray too far from the original question.

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Originally Posted by Tom Bick View Post
Hi thorn, one thing I have learnt with running on double brood is that you hardly ever need to inspect the lower BB only if you are concerned. The more experienced simply split the two BBís like a hinge and if they donít see evidence of QCís on the bottom of the top frames then thatís the inspection over. I have done a couple of inspections like this but it takes a bit of nerve.
If you do find queen cells at the bottom of the frames in the upper brood box do you then check each frame more carefully, and also those in the lower box?

If not, what's the normal thing to do?
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Old 14th February 2013, 12:00 AM   #2
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The idea behind the "tipping" inspection seems to be that the beek's time is money.
And that it is then a matter of weighing the cost of the beek's time against the chance of missing swarm cells that aren't in the obvious location at the bottom of the upper frames.

Playing the odds and time-cost effectiveness don't generally shape the way that hobby beeks enjoy their hobby.
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Old 14th February 2013, 12:12 AM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by itma View Post
The idea behind the "tipping" inspection seems to be that the beek's time is money.
Doesn't this "tipping" cause less disturbance?
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Old 14th February 2013, 12:23 AM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BeeJoyful View Post
Doesn't this "tipping" cause less disturbance?
Yes, it doesn't involve inspecting brood, comb, stores ...
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"Polycarbonate is better than glass, and preferably with no hole in it." -- itma
"Alligators and fire ants are considered dangerous under the Rules of Golf. Rattlesnakes and bees fall under the same heading... you are entitled to a free drop on the nearest spot that is no closer to the hole and out of danger" -- [Decision 1-4/10]
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Old 14th February 2013, 12:26 AM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BeeJoyful View Post
Doesn't this "tipping" cause less disturbance?
Depends, some times this "tipping" aggressively rips apart a whole pile of drone brood between the boxes. Swarming preparation check and varroa level check in one quick move but in these cases I usually take more time cleaning the mess up so its easier next time.

And yes, if charged q cells are seen then I put the top box aside and go through the bottom frames, replace the top box and go through that too.

Last edited by mbc; 14th February 2013 at 12:28 AM.
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Old 14th February 2013, 09:58 AM   #6
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as per mbc - the tipping of top box is a rapid, effective screening tool.

once a hive is found making preps for swarming then FULL inspection needed as per normal with necessary interventions as desired.
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Old 14th February 2013, 10:05 AM   #7
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I have no excluder and I use in middle summer 3 brood.

If something exists in douple brood, you see it all in upper brood box.
No need to look lower.

When you see queen cells, they are going to swarm. Do at once the false swarm and troubles are over.

I do not brake queen cells. I let them kill each others.

I have queen cells often in supers too.

The most important is to join hive parts when swarming fever is over.

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Old 14th February 2013, 10:07 AM   #8
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.
In lower box there are those angry foragers and it is not nice to disturbe them.

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Old 14th February 2013, 10:10 AM   #9
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To stop drone brood between the box's put the top box at right angles to the bottom box, it causes far less disturbance, makes them easier to part, prevents lifting bottom frame that has been stuck to upper frame and it doesn't worry the bees at all.....
E
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Old 14th February 2013, 12:52 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by enrico View Post
To stop drone brood between the box's put the top box at right angles to the bottom box, it causes far less disturbance, makes them easier to part, prevents lifting bottom frame that has been stuck to upper frame and it doesn't worry the bees at all.....
E
Quote:
Originally Posted by mbc View Post
Depends, some times this "tipping" aggressively rips apart a whole pile of drone brood between the boxes. Swarming preparation check and varroa level check in one quick move but in these cases I usually take more time cleaning the mess up so its easier next time.

And yes, if charged q cells are seen then I put the top box aside and go through the bottom frames, replace the top box and go through that too.
If the bee space is correct between the bottom of the frames in the top box and the tops of the frames in the bottom box, would they put comb between?
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